Another Protestant Pastor Embraces Orthodoxy in Kaliningrand, Russia

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RUSSIA OF MY HEART

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Another Protestant Pastor

Embraces Orthodoxy in Kaliningrand, Russia

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.wordpress.com

Another Protestant Pastor Embraces Orthodoxy

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

On Sunday April 17, 2016, Nikita Yeremeyev, former pastor of a Protestant community, was received into Orthodoxy in Kaliningrad, reports the Kaliningrad Diocese’s official website.

“My conversion to Orthodoxy from Protestantism is not a mere desertion from the enemy’s army, but rather a result of some sort of evolution of worldview. In Protestantism I became acquainted with the Christ of the Gospel. And in Orthodoxy, I have met the Christ Who lives now, in the sacraments of the body of the Church,” the young pastor relates.

Nikita Yeremeyev compares Orthodoxy with the promised land: “I would compare my joining of the Protestant community with the escape from Egypt (that is, from the sinful world) to the Desert of Sinai. And my return to Orthodoxy is like the crossing the Jordan, the beginning of the invasion of the promised land. This is how early Fathers of the Church characterized a Christian’s life: this is the struggle and death in battle for the land of meekness, for the life with Christ in the Heavenly Kingdom.”

According to the chairman of the missionary department of the Kaliningrad Diocese Priest Alexander Permyakov, other Protestants have a keen interest in Orthodoxy as well.

“The problem is that Protestants encounter one Orthodoxy in books, but see another Orthodoxy in the lives of Orthodox Christians themselves. And this is the main reason of why these sincere people are still not with us,” the priest noted.

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A Group of Protestants Adopt Orthodoxy on the day of Holy Saturday in Kaliningrad, Russia, 2010

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ORTHODOXY IS LOVE

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.comHERE

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

A Group of Protestants Will Adopt Orthodoxy on the day of Holy Saturday, 2010

2 April 2010, Interfax – A group of former Protestants will be baptized on the eve of Easter in St. Andrew Church of Kaliningrad, Russia.

Young men and women started visiting an Orthodox church several months ago. In the past, they had one problem – drug addiction – and they tried to get rid of it in the Transfiguration of Russia Protestant charitable organization, the Kaliningrad edition of the Komsomolskaya Pravda daily has reported on Thursday.

However, now the former Protestants want to adopt the (Orthodox) Christian faith.

“In the past, people seeked (sic) for cures in sects as there were few Orthodox communities capable to effectively solving the problems of such people. However, time proved that even richest sects have got neither the experience nor authority to help them.”

«I was amazed by the holiness of Christians» — Interview with Anton Gotman, former Buddhist, Russia

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WHAT ABOUT YOGA?

«I was amazed by the holiness of Christians»

Interview with Anton Gotman, former Buddhist

Priest George Maximov, Anton Gotman

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/110384.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

We continue to publish the texts of Spas TV program My Path to God, where Priest George Maximov interviews people who converted to Orthodoxy. The guest of today’s program is Anton Gotman, who had been practicing Buddhism for a long time. In this interview, he will tell us what he was looking for but couldn’t find in Buddhism and how Christ touched his heart. We will also discuss the personal and impersonal aspects of faith as well as the artificiality of “Russian Buddhism”.

* * *

Priest George Maximov: Hello, you are watching My Path To God. The guest of today’s program is Anton Gotman, a man who has a firsthand knowledge of the Buddhist tradition. Anton Sergeyevich, here’s my first question: What did you think of God before you became a Buddhist?

Anton Gotman: I didn’t have a true faith in God. I was baptized when I was eight. Occasionally, I would go to church with my parents. Basically, they were believers, but I didn’t see any purpose behind their faith. Every now and then I’d come across some books but that was it… I didn’t have an in-depth understanding of the Christian tradition. Once in a while I’d go to church and meet the priest. I really liked him as a person, but I didn’t appreciate Christianity. Later, I got interested in rock music and martial arts and started to distance myself from religion, so that at some point I even began to think that Christianity was an utter nonsense. After a while, when I got into college, I got interested in the Orient. I tried to study the Roerichs’1 teachings, but they didn’t impress me at all and neither did other theosophical ideas. Then a difficult period of my life followed, and I was very depressed. By chance, I came across a Soviet book on religious studies that described Buddhism, and it became an eye opener for me. I learned about “the four noble truths”2 and became interested, so I started studying Buddhism with some people who practiced it. After a while, I decided that I wanted to be taught by a teacher of the true Buddhist tradition.

Father George: What did you find attractive in Buddhism?

Anton Gotman: I did not believe in God, and for people who do not believe in God but wish to live righteous lives or have something spiritual in their lives, Buddhism can show a certain way. In fact, Buddha taught many things that were right. For example, just like Christianity, Buddhism teaches that we must not kill. On the one hand, it is the same, but there is a significant difference. We can’t say that Buddhists follow God’s commandment, “Thou shall not kill”, because it is not God’s commandment for them. You can say that people follow God’s commandments only when they believe in God.

Father George: Yes, motivation is important.

—I saw Buddhism as an opportunity for developing certain qualities. My interest in martial arts was an influence too.—(Anton Gotman)

Anton Gotman: Even though there is no faith in God in Buddhism, it offers a certain spiritual way and a system of meditation that at some point attracts people and allows them to relax and experience certain positive feelings. In Tibetan Buddhism, where I was a member of the community of Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche, everything was much more interesting, with more mystic experiences and opportunities to do yoga, etc… I’ll try not to overuse the Читать ««I was amazed by the holiness of Christians» — Interview with Anton Gotman, former Buddhist, Russia» далее

Mission on the White Continent: Αn Interview with Hieromonk Pavel Gelyastanov

Mission on the White Continent:

Αn Interview with Hieromonk Pavel Gelyastanov

 

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2013/03/13/mission-on-the-white-continent-an-interview-with-hieromonk-pavel-gelyastanov/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

We often complain about life: Public transport is really annoying… Where are all these people going anyway?… We’ve had enough of this rain… Why is this heat so unbearable?… What do they want me to do anyway? I’m fed up with all this shouting and noise and fuss… We could go on listing the complaints, dreaming about being on our own and how nice it is everywhere else, and in general having a moan and making out we want to get away from it all. But once you are at the end of the earth, suddenly everything is the other way around and you look at the world in a completely new way.

These are the thoughts I had when I met Hieromonk Pavel (Gelyastanov) who had just come back from an obedience of 15 months in the Antarctic. I don’t know if it is correct to call the Antarctic the end of the earth, but it could probably be called the end of the planet or the end of the map. Though, on the other hand, you can’t really see any earth in the Antarctic, rather it’s all ice, snow, water and rocks and Polar birdlife. But on top of this you have the people who are always there, far fewer than the visitors, but they live there in the kingdom of snow for about a year on average: they come from various countries to carry out some special task and then go home. This is why the Antarctic, discovered in 1820 by the Russian explorers Bellingshausen and Lazarev, is called a free country: there are no politics, no economy, no citizenship, no social divisions…

How did Fr Paul, a monk from the Novospassky Monastery in Moscow, end up there? I tried to find the answer to this question not among the ice, but in Minsk, in our monastery where Father had come to ‘thaw out’ after his very long winter stay.

 

Tell us, Fr Paul, how come you went to the Antarctic?

At the request of Archbishop Theognost, the Superior of the Holy Trinity-St Sergius Monastery, a decree was issued by his Holiness the Patriarch that I should be sent as a member of the 56th Russian Antarctic Expedition. I arrived there on 3 March 2011 to serve in the Holy Trinity church in Bellingshausen.

This is the only church in the southern continent and, it must be said, as such it is not only the object of curiosity, but also of respect. Anyone who goes to our island first of all goes to church, has their photo taken, asks about the history of the church and many come and venerate the icons. It’s a local sight.

When we flew in, the first thing we did was to hold a thanksgiving service. We Читать «Mission on the White Continent: Αn Interview with Hieromonk Pavel Gelyastanov» далее

Video: Flash Mob in Moscow, Russia — Christmas 2011

Flash Mob in Moscow, Russia — Christmas 2011

Video: Heaven on Earth — Orthodox Russia

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RUSSIA OF MY HEART

ORTHODOX HEART

Heaven on Earth — Orthodox Russia

Saint Matrona of Moscow, Russia (+1952) — April 19 & May 2

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SAINTS BOOK — ORTHODOXY

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Saint Matrona of Moscow, Russia (+1952)

April 19 & May 2

Source:

http://antiochian.org

http://antiochian.org/node/18294

ANTIOCHIAN ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

ARCHDIOCESE OF NORTH AMERICA

Saint Matrona was born in 1881 into a poor family in the village of Sebino-Epifaniskaya (now Kimovski) in the Tula region of Russia. Blind from birth, she bore her infirmity with humility and patience, and God made her a vessel of grace. At the moment of her baptism, the priest saw a cloud above the child, which shed forth a sweet fragrance as a sign of divine favor. From the age of six or seven, she exhibited an extraordinary gift of insight, discerning sicknesses of soul and body in the many people who visited her, revealing to them their secret sins and their problems, and healing them through prayer and wise counsel. Around the age of fourteen, she made a pilgrimage to the great holy places in Russia along with a devout benefactress. When they arrived at Kronstadt to receive the blessing of St. John, they became lost in the crowd. St. John suddenly cried out, “Matrona, come here! She will be my heir, and will become the eighth pillar of Russia.” At that time, no one understood the meaning of this prophecy.

When she turned seventeen, Matrona became paralyzed and was unable to walk from then on. Knowing that this was God’s will, she never complained but thanked the Lord. For the rest of her life – over fifty years – she lived in a room filled with icons, sitting cross legged on her bed. With a radiant face and a quiet voice, she received all who came to seek divine consolation through her presence. She foretold the great misfortunes that were to sweep down upon the country after the Bolshevik revolution, placing her gift of Читать «Saint Matrona of Moscow, Russia (+1952) — April 19 & May 2» далее